Kids feet with dandelion flowers lying on green grass in sunny day. Concept happy chidlhood.

3 Common Myths About Bunions

Bunions are a very common foot condition that can vary in severity, depending on your age, health and genetics. While many of us may suffer from bunions, there are several misconceptions about what it’s like to live with them. Throughout this post, we will bust 3 common myths about bunions to help shed some light on the topic! 

Myth #1: Bunions are hereditary 

Indeed, you may have heard this myth from your parents or your grandparents; but bunions aren’t what you inherited from them. A bunion can result from faulty or unfavorable mechanisms which in one way or another put sufficient stress on the area of your foot for bunions to form. The only thing in this scenario inherited from your family is the bone structure; their shape and size. This, however, only implies how your bones may favor a particular walking pattern that may make your feet more prone to a bunion. 

Myth #2: You can never get rid of a bunion

Don’t think that once you develop a bunion, that annoying friend will stay with you for the rest of your life. There are treatment options! Most people believe that a bunion can come back even after undergoing surgery. In a few cases, it is possible; but this isn’t very common and depends on the individual’s medical history.

Myth #3: Heels invite bunions

Many people believe that heels make you prone to getting a bunion, but this claim is as true as claiming that the earth is flat! Just because more women suffer from bunions than men, this idea has gained much popularity. People with a particular foot shape are more likely to develop a bunion than others. 

Hopefully we were able to bust some common myths about bunions in our blog post today! As always, if you believe you have a bunion that causes foot pain or interferes with your daily life, schedule an appointment with a foot doctor. At Foxhall Podiatry, we have flexible appointment times and an expert, caring staff that will provide you with the information that you need. You can call our office at (202) 966-4811 or fill out our online appointment request form

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